Performance, Installation, Exhibition and Illustration
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Installation

Installation

My freelance work has seen me collaborate with a variety of artists and industry professionals from across the visual and performing arts community. This has meant that at different times I have taken on different roles within a group, working together in order to best realise a project. This has enabled me to develop a unique range of skills and knowledge that offer a fresh, holistic, insight into the process of creating art for installations and events.

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Southern Crossings (one step at a time like this)

For this project I designed and installed a temporary performance space for a group of independent, performance artists whose were commissioned to set-up inside Southern Cross Station and create a self-guided audio experience. This involved negotiation between the performance artists, contractors, Melbourne City Council and the governing body of Southern Cross Station to achieve a successful outcome.

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merrel shoes (mothers art)

This image shows one of four diorama based installations I was commissioned to create for production company ‘Mothers Art’. It was photographed and edited for a high profile shoe company (Merrel) as part of a marketing campaign to promote their product.

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table centrepiece (wedding)

This image shows a design for a wedding table centrepiece I produced during my early freelance career when I was based in Sydney. It was inspired by my love of Irish mythology and artwork by Brian Froud and Julek Heller.

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fuga ludo (art installation - Northern Exposure)

Myself and fellow artist Tim McGaw created and installed this artwork as part of the ‘Northern Exposure’ art event, based in selected shop windows on High Street Northcote. Titled Fuga Ludo, which translates from Latin to mean ‘Flight of Fancy’, this piece was created for hairdressing business Green Butterfly and refers to an idea that shows a lot of imagination, but no immediate, real-life application. It shows a migratory line of rustic, everyday figures from which emerges their creative potential in the form of butterflies (a known metaphor for change).